Carvana CEO Ernie Garcia on data science, technology investment and disrupting an industry | ZDNet (ZDNet)

Garcia gives a real answer to an interesting problem that is core to be able to scale their business model – Carvana buys every car unseen – ‘…the truth is, foundationally, our problem is a problem that requires a lot of data-centricity. As I said, every car that we buy, sight unseen, is a differentiated asset. Every car is different. We have to collect all the data we possibly can and be intelligent about which cars we buy. We have to look at all the click stream data on our website, which cars customers are attracted to, and be smart about allocating our capital and our inventory to cars that customers want. We’ve got a standard, a very standard data problem in our credit process, where we’re trying to get customers as few a click financing as we possibly can, and so we’re going to do all that credit scoring and pricing and structuring. We’ve got kind of traditional operations research problems in our logistics network, where we have to optimize our scheduling and we have to optimize where we put cars on which trucks, because we own our own logistics network. Just the reality of our business is that there are many, many different data problems inside of it.’ By Larry Dignan for Between the Lines and ZDnet.com

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Security Think Tank: Cyber attack survival not a matter of luck (ComputerWeekly.com)

‘If businesses are to survive such an event, the preparations need to cover legal obligations and customer relations as well as the technical aspects. The choices to be made depend on the type of business and the resources available, but fundamentally, “best industry practice” needs to be used to defend against an attack, and a response plan needs to be in place to enable a rapid recovery. Using best practice not only helps defend against an attack, but also shows that the business has done what is reasonable and expected to defend against the attack, and is therefore not negligent. However, “best practice” is not static – it is necessary to keep up as the threat and technology evolve. ‘ Paddy Francis via Computerweekly.com

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The biggest surprise of Microsoft Flight Simulator: it makes Bing cool (Polygon)

This amazing statistic caught my eye: ‘a single copy of Microsoft Flight Simulator would need 20,000 Blue Ray Discs if you wanted to ship it like in the old days. Assets include more than 2 million cities and over 40,000 individual airports. To achieve this, developers at Asobo Studio are tapping directly into Microsoft’s Bing Maps dataset. Flight Simulator will draw from two of the service’s three available petabytes of geographical information. That includes satellite imagery and 3D photogrammetry data, with some resolutions down to just three centimeters. The results are stunning. New York City looks nearly indistinguishable from the real place.’ Oh, and you can experience everything in realtime, accurate weather conditions: it features live weather pulled directly from Bing. That means the game uses things like live wind speed and direction, humidity, precipitation, and other factors to feed data into a simulation that’s constantly swirling in real-time.’ Charlie Hall takes a realistic testflight via polygon.com

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